Siddhartha is a novel by Hermann Hesse that deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery of a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha. The book, Hesse's ninth novel, was written in German, in a simple, lyrical style. It was published in the U.S. in 1951 and became influential during the 1960s. Hesse dedicated the first part of it to Romain Rolland and the second part to Wilhelm Gundert, his cousin.

Average user rating

0 / 5

Rating breakdown

5
0
4
0
3
0
2
0
1
0

Similar Free eBooks

  • El Intruso

    Available: Epub 8 Downloads
  • The Vampyre, a Tale

    Available: Epub 17 Downloads
  • A Sicilian Romance

    Available: Epub 8 Downloads
  • Household Stories

    Available: N/A 0 Downloads
  • Getting Married

    Available: Epub 9 Downloads
  • 'Mid Pleasures and Palaces

    Available: Epub 6 Downloads
    It was, Kirk thought, like standing in a gully, watching a boulder teeter precariously above you. It might fall at any minute, crushing your life out instantly beneath its weight. Your only possible defenses are your brain and voice—but how do you argue with a boulder which neither sees nor hears?
  • The City of Dreadful Night

    Available: Epub 6 Downloads
  • Uller Uprising

    Available: Epub 9 Downloads
    The story of a confrontation between a human overlord and alien servants, with an ironic twist at the end. Like most of Piper's best work, Uller Uprising is modeled after an actual event in human history; in this case the Sepoy Mutiny -- though not a mere retelling of the Indian Mutiny, but rather an analysis of an historical event applied to a similar situation in the far future.
  • Oroonoko

    Available: Epub 7 Downloads
    I do not pretend, in giving you the history of this Royal Slave, to entertain my reader with adventures of a feigned hero, whose life and fortunes fancy may manage at the poet's pleasure; nor in relating the truth, design to adorn it with any accidents but such as arrived in earnest to him: and it shall come simply into the world, recommended by its own proper merits and natural intrigues; there being enough of reality to support it, and to render it diverting, without the addition of invention.